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in the country. that will dry up. we are committed to making penn affordable for the undergraduates which costs $181 million a year. that's twice the amount it costs us eight years august because we ramped up financial aid, and the more unemployment terrorist in the country, the more we spend on financial aid, and it would be a tragedy if the country moved in a direction to make education less affordable so, we, as a university, are very dependent and very concerned about the fiscal health of the country. >> host: are you also in the classroom here at the university? >> guest: i do enjoy teaching, and i take every opportunity to meet with students to tox r talk to students and teach in the spare time. >> host: what does a provost do, and how long were you at princeton? >> guest: i was at princeton for 28 years from the time i got my ph.d. to the time i came to penn, and i was deep of the faculty at simpson since the chief academic and chief financial officer at princeton so the provost works closely with the president. >> host: what's the learning curve on being a president of the university? >
it in the book. it was made by irving penn, the great 20th century portrait photographer verboten magazine and actually appeared in "vogue" magazine, although it took me several months to figure out exactly when and where.ccc any event committee was madecc in 1951, so it hasn't been seenc about six decades since the last photograph of rachel carson. by far the best photographs of her ever taken. she would've been 44 years old in this photograph and i just think it's terrific. penn actually shot it this way. it's not cropped. that's the way he photographed. looking around this audience tonight, i suspect most of you know who rachel carson is, but i can tell you generally that is not the case with a lot of people. baby boomers and people older than baby researcher amber carson and her work and young people in high school and college are studying rachel carson again in environmental studies classes and they are more likely to know who person was. but in between is a great doughnut hole. i thought that people don't don't know rachel carson, don't know "silent spring" and as a result don't
in administering the award. and before i get into the issue i want to recognize eric, a fellow penn guy. i went to penn, and it's nice to see someone else from penn in this town doing this kind of work and doing it in a cutting edge and honest way, and i also want to recognize ambassador cohen who clearly had the hardest job in the israel foreign ministry being the ambassador from israel. it's a testament that you're still here. anyway, it was interesting to me that when rob contacted me about doing this, the wanted to call this session, egypt on the brink again. and not only does this have the benefit of being true, yet again, but it's a particularly apt description of what we're likely to see in egypt for the foreseeable future. and not only is it what we see in egypt for the future but it's perfectly consistent with egypt's modern history, and the central drama in egypt is the egyptian political history. rob asked me to keep my remarks focused on the current situation. i can't help myself and i have to digress into some of the scenes of the struggle because i think they reflect well on what
that connect new jersey to manhattan? today penn station accommodates 550,000 passengers a day. that's double the peak passengers that go through the three airports of new york. but in 1900 those tunnels were called a boondoggle, too expensive, impossible to build. some of the shareholders probably thought he was nuts, but today could you imagine new york without it? well, sandy showed us what new york looks like without it. so it's up to us now to create the vision, to do the planning, to execute the projects that will insure we hold true to a basic promise. as the secretary said last week, that the america we leave for future generations is even greater, even stronger than the america our parents and grandparents left for us. and i look forward to answering your questions. >> thank you. and we'll hold questions. i just have one quick thing. have you read conquering gotham? >> yes, sir, i have with great interest. [laughter] >> okay. i was going to make sure you had a copy, if you didn't. mr. boardman, our amtrak ceo, you're recognized. welcome back. >> thank you, mr. mica, and thank you for
at the university of penn, what is your reaction to the photographer? what do you say? >> my reaction to the photographer is my reaction to all the photographs that appear in my book that depict pictures of war, pictures of terror, pictures of natural disaster. all of which have been capsized in this moment of people facing death, and my argument has long been that if they're willing to read the news about these events, we should be willing to see the pictures of these events the pictures do different things, but there are no less important as vehicles of affirmation relayed and other words. so as long as we keep saying, i want to know about this event, but i don't want to see pictures about it, we are not privileging , not excepting, not recognizing how images bring us into the news in a way that is different from words. >> well, someone argue that this image we are about to show here in about to die is very different than an image of a man on a train track are a woman jumping out of a building. what are we seeing here? >> we are seeing here is a kevin carter image that was taken in
crisis, the commercial paper prices, penn central and other. goldman got into trouble than for selling bonds for full value. and so they pulled back. the policies, ranging price controls. and it wasn't until finally and again under pressure from the germans in particular, volker understood that one had to break american labor in order to stabilize. we interviewed him. and he said, very interestingly, the more important than what i do in raising interest rates to 18% to drive up unemployment high was in. [inaudible] more important and that was the air traffic controllers' strike. nixon's breaking of the union. it was very interesting that he was said that. a very explicit. question i raise another dimension of the politics that i think, where we're going. and that has to do with how labor was responding to all of this. and to understand that you have to go back to 1945. and labor was very strong coming of the war. and the question was, where with lipper go? with labor move toward challenging capitalism jack would it talk about democratizing the economy, talk about controlling finance, c
. before i get into this, i would like to recognize eric trager. he is a fellow penn graduate. it is nice to see someone else from penn in this town doing this kind of work and doing it in a cutting edge and great way. i also want to recognize ambassador cohen, who had the hardest job from israel. as a testament to his character. it is interesting to me that when rob contacted me about doing this, he wanted to call the session egypt on the brink. not only does this have the benefit of being true yet again, but it is a particularly apt description of what we are likely to see in egypt for the foreseeable future. not only is it what we see with the future, but perfectly consistent with egypt's modern political history. in the central drama and egypt's history. it could digress a little bit in the struggle. because i think they reflect well on what is likely to happen. it is clear that what we are seeing now at this moment is a reflection of the fact that no party, not the muslim brotherhood were not the liberals and not revolutionaries, not anybody we see out there. that is part of a factio
some hope that there is a future for them to new jersey and around the region. >> let me close to penne with your indulgence on this issue by saying number one we await that the supplemental looks like an reserve judgment until then. number twocoworker to synthesize a supplemental, need flexibility in being able to seek the recovery we don't want. in addition to a perfect storm, there's another perfect storm here. reject the storm in the midst of the winter and most hurricanes aren't golf seasons and summer seasons totally different in terms of the consequence. huge in terms of the impact, but still in to recover without the ravishing winter months. if we have a northeastern come our defenses are so far down that it would be like a person's immune system being sent to pull. thirdly, we come with less than 30 days to the end of congress, which has to be done. i feel like i have to be houdini to accomplish this. so we are going to do this. so secretary, i look forward to your work and how basic it there. thank you, mr. chairman. >> i would note that senator menendez will cherish the commi
encourages a bidding war for affluent black students whether they're going to go to harvard or yale or penn. who's offering more money to people who don't need it instead of offering it to people who do need it, whatever race? so we thought that was a slam dunk. we also thought it was necessary to avoid an end run around our second claim which is race-based preferences can't be any larger than socioeconomic preferences because the universities might say -- in fact, they would say, hey, we can handle that, we'll just give race-based scholarships to even things up. so we would like to debunk that evasion. >> okay. we're going to have of one last question, and this gentleman right here directly in the middle of the second row. >> my name's gerald chandler from itech consul taxes. i'd like to go back to the question of children without getting married. both after the children is born how many eventually get married and say you actually transform yourself into a married family with children, and how many have stable relationships that may go on 20, 30 years without getting married and jet still
of depression and we know that one study in 2004 out of penn state university said that adolescents who played sports are eight times more likely to be active in sports at age 24 as adolescents who do not play sports. so in a nation we have a real interesting getting and keeping as many kids active in sports in their teenage years as possible. at the same time, we have another set of statistics we have to contend with particularly as it relates to the sport of football. you know i worked for espn and we recently conducted a survey of parents and 58% of those with suns younger than age 15 say they were cole very concerned about youth with all injuries. nearly one in five discouraged their sons from playing the game. foot wall has the highest concussion rate in sports along with hockey, and you have a lot of parents, a lot of people are wondering chico is this a game that is safe for my kid? should i introduce them to at? what are the short-term consequences? what are the long-term health consequences? so the central question we are going to be looking at today is how can football, the instituti
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)